Car Title Loans in Socorro County New Mexico NM in 15 Minutes, Specializing in Autos and Trucks - One Way Title Loans
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Car Title Loans in Socorro County, New Mexico

- Socorro County Auto Title Loans Specialist.

Do you need cash now? One Way Car Title Loans serves the Socorro County, New Mexico area. You can borrow up to $20,000 in 15 minutes.* You can use the equity in your car to get a car title loan in 15 minutes or less.*

Got bad credit or no credit? Don't worry! Got a repossession or past bankruptcy? Don't worry! NO PROBLEM at One Way Title Loans! Apply now for an instant quote on how much you can borrow.

CALL TOLL FREE 1-888-723-8813
Open 7 Days a Week 9AM to 9PM

Socorro County Car Title Loans
Socorro Car Title Loans Magdalena Car Title Loans

One Way Title Loans can fund you immediately because we're the direct lender so there is no red tape. We have the lowest rates with no prepayment penalties. We will even go to your work or your home to hand deliver the check. We also take care of the DMV paperwork so you don't have to wait in line all day. Call us or apply online now for an instant 3 minute* approval on your auto title loan.

What is a Title Loan?
A car title loan is a fast way to borrow money using the equity in your paid off vehicle as collateral for a loan. Call us now for instant approval.

Do I need good credit to get a loan?
No, your credit history is not a factor. Your approval is based upon your vehicle's equity, vehicle's condition and your income.

How much can I borrow?
You can borrow anywhere from $2600 to $15000 depending on the wholesale value of your vehicle and your income. Please fill out the Application to see how much you qualify for.

How long does it take to get a car title loan?
Your money will be ready in 15 minutes or less.* Many car title loan companies advertise 15 minutes or less but in reality take much longer, even 24-48 hours. Some competitors request you to go to DMV to add them as lien holder.

Why choose a car title loan over a bank loan?
Most people choose car title loans because they do not qualify for traditional bank loans. Car title loans are also processed more quickly and have fewer requirements than bank loans.

Contact us today at 1-888-723-8813.


About Socorro County

Socorro County is a county located in the U.S. state of New Mexico. As of the 2010 census, the population was 17,866, making it the eleventh least populated county and twenty-first most populated county in New Mexico. The county seat is Socorro. Socorro was originally the name given to a Native American village (see: Puebloan peoples) by Don Juan de Oñate in 1598. Having received vitally needed food and assistance from the native population, Oñate named the pueblo Socorro ("succor" in English). The big communities in Socorro County are: Socorro, New Mexico, Magdalena, New Mexico and Alamo, New Mexico.

Socorro County is home to multiple scientific research institutions including New Mexico Institute of Mining and Technology, the National Radio Astronomy Observatory and its associated Very Large Array, the Magdalena Ridge Observatory, and the Langmuir Laboratory for Atmospheric Research. Federal public lands in Socorro County include parts of the Cibola National Forest, the Bosque del Apache National Wildlife Refuge, the Sevilleta National Wildlife Refuge, the Bureau of Land Management (BLM) Socorro Field Office, parts of the Salinas Pueblo Missions National Monument, and parts of the El Camino Real de Tierra Adentro National Historic Trail.

Socorro County ranges in elevation from approximately 4,528 ft (1,380 m) on the banks of the Rio Grande to 10,784 ft (3,287 m) at the top of South Baldy peak in the Magdalena Mountains. The southern portion of the Rocky Mountains extend into New Mexico and Socorro County. There are several mountain ranges that spread throughout the county. The Forest Service manages portions of four mountain ranges: the Bear, Datil, Magdalena, and San Mateo Mountains. Most of the land that comprises these mountains are within the Cibola National Forest. These ranges, as well as Ladron Peak located in Socorro County, are classified as sky islands.

The history of Socorro County is intimately linked with the rich history of the surrounding area. Basham noted in his report documenting the archeological history of the Cibola National Forest’s Magdalena Ranger District, which is located almost entirely within Socorro County, that “[t]he heritage resources on the district are diverse and representative of nearly every prominent human evolutionary event known to anthropology. Evidence for human use of district lands date back 14,000 years to the Paleoindian period providing glimpses into the peopling of the New World and megafaunal extinction.“ Much of the now Magdalena Ranger District were a province of the Apache. Bands of Apache effectively controlled the Magdalena-Datil region from the seventeenth century until they were defeated in the Apache Wars in the late nineteenth century. Outlaw renegades Butch Cassidy and the Wild Bunch and notorious Apaches like Cochise and Geronimo have ties to Socorro County's San Mateo Mountains. Vicks Peak was named after Victorio, “a Mimbreño Apache leader whose territory included much of the south and southwest New Mexico.” Famous for defying relocation orders in 1879 and leading his warriors “on a two-year reign of terror before he was killed,” Victorio is at least as highly regarded as Geronimo or Cochise among Apaches. Perhaps most famous outlaw was the Apache Kid whose supposed grave lies within the Apache Kid Wilderness. Stories of depredations by the Apache Kid, and of his demise, became so common and dramatic that in southwestern folklore they may be exceeded only by tales of lost Spanish gold. Native Americans lingered in the San Mateos well into the 1900s. We know this by an essay written by Aldo Leopold in 1919 where he documents stumbling upon the remains of a recently abandoned Indian hunting camp.

There are 17,866 people living in Socorro County as of the 2010 census. 75.1% White 1.1% Black 11.7% Native American 1.2% Asian 0.0% Native Hawaiian or Pacific Islander 2.8% Two or more races 8.1% Other races 48.5% Hispanic or Latino (of any race)

With multiple mountain ranges, extents of grasslands and marshes providing a wide array of available habitats, Socorro County is home to an extensive variety of ecosystems and wildlife. Socorro County contains 826 species of wildlife, including 14 amphibians, 60 reptiles, 336 birds, and 96 mammals. Wildlife in the County includes coyote, deer, elk, pronghorn antelope, bighorn sheep, Barbary sheep, black bear, mountain lion, wild turkey, various furbearers, Mexican Spotted Owl, and quail.

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